We have the power to make California a place we’re proud to call home, but we’re up against corporate developers who rig the rules to jack up our rents and build only for the wealthy. Corporate landlord lobbyists are making it impossible for us to afford a place to live, leading to massive increases in homelessness all across the state. Orange, Alameda, Sacramento, Los Angeles — these are only some of the counties that have seen an uptick in people living on the streets this year. Yet our legislators have been slow to act. Why?

The California Apartment Association (CAA) and the real estate lobby, working to kill strong tenant protections, spent millions in the 2017-2018 election cycle. Combined in 2018, they contributed a whopping $2,875,500 directly to the California Republican and Democratic Parties. They also contributed hundreds of thousands to Political Action Committees that then spent money in support of some of our legislators.

This influence continues, but a shift has begun. AB 1482 can help stop outrageous rent increases and unlawful evictions. It passed through the Assembly and has newfound support from the California Democratic Party and Governor Newsom. Now that it’s moving through the Senate, educate yourself on where senators stand on the bill and how much influence the landlord lobby has over them!


AB 1482 will protect millions of families who rent by establishing an upper limit, or cap, on allowable annual rent increases. It will also protect tenants from being unjustly evicted by requiring that landlords provide in writing a reason for the eviction.
SENATE
Legislator 2019 Vote on Tenants' Right
to Organize (SB 529)*
Percent of Renters in
District (by County)**
Percent of Renters Paying 30%+
of Income on Rent**
Campaign Contributions from Real
Estate Lobby (2016-2018)***
How they plan to vote

Sen. Anthony Portantino
(D-District 25)

Yes
Los Angeles: 54.1% Los Angeles: 56.1% $22,400

Sen. Ben Hueso
(D-District 40)

Failure to vote
Imperial: 43.6%, San Diego: 47% Imperial: 50.6%, San Diego: 54.2% $18,050

Sen. Bill Dodd
(D-District 3)

No
Solano: 40%, Napa: 36.9%, Sonoma: 39.7%, Sacramento: 44.5% Solano: 53.2%, Napa: 50.8%, Sonoma: 53.1%, Sacramento: 52.2% $15,600

Sen. Bob Archuleta
(D-District 32)

No
Orange: 42.6%, Los Angeles: 54.1% Orange: 55%, Los Angeles: 56.1% $13,700

Sen. Cathleen Galgiani
(D-District 5)

Yes
San Joaquin: 44.3%, Stanislaus: 42.9% San Joaquin: 52.8%, Stanislaus: 52.6% $28,300

Sen. Jerry Hill
(D-District 13)

No, then Yes San Mateo: 40.3%, Santa Clara: 43.1% San Mateo: 47.7%, Santa Clara: 45.8% $26,400

Sen. Steve Glazer
(D-District 7)

Failure to vote
Contra Costa: 34.5% Contra Costa: 50.7% $31,331
ASSEMBLY
Legislator 2018 Vote on Just Cause
for Evictions (AB 2925)*
Percent of Renters in
District (by County)**
Percent of Renters Paying 30%+
of Income on Rent**
Campaign Contributions from Real
Estate Lobby (2017-2018)***
How They Plan to Vote

Asm. Al Muratsuchi
(D-District 66)

Failure to vote
Los Angeles: 54.1% Los Angeles: 56.1% $12,300

Asm. Autumn Burke
(D-District 62)

Failure to vote
Los Angeles: 54.1% Los Angeles: 56.1% $11,400

Asm. Brian Maienschein
(D-District 77)

No
San Diego: 47.0% San Diego: 54.2% $16,800

Asm. Cecilia Aguiar-Curry
(D-District 4)

Failure to vote
El Dorado: 23.7%, Alpine: 16.8%, Placer: 29.2% El Dorado: 46.3%, Alpine: 33.3%, Placer: 49.1% $8,600

Asm. Freddie Rodriguez
(D-District 52)

Failure to vote
Los Angeles: 54.1%, San Bernardino: 40.8% Los Angeles: 56.1%, San Bernardino: 55.5% $12,300

Asm. Susan Talamantes Eggman
(D-District 13)

Failure to vote
San Joaquin: 44.3% San Joaquin: 52.8% $4,000

Asm. Sydney Kamlager-Dove
(D-District 54)

No
Los Angeles: 54.1% Los Angeles: 56.1% $30,800

* California Legislature Bill Information, Vote History: http://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billNavClient.xhtml?bill_id=201920200SB529 and http://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billNavClient.xhtml?bill_id=201720180AB2925

** This data is for the most dominant counties located within each legislator’s district. Data was obtained through the American Community Survey (ACS) 2017 (5-Year Estimates) U.S. Census Bureau.

*** This data comes from campaign contribution filings on the California Secretary of State and the Institute for Money in Politics’ Follow the Money tool: https://www.followthemoney.org/ , for both the California Apartment Association (CAA) and the California Association of Realtors (CAR), including direct campaign contributions and some of their Independent Expenditures. [Both lobby groups spent millions in the 2017-2018 election cycle to influence elections in California, but who specifically they were supporting can be hard to trace when they contributed to pooled PAC’s supporting multiple candidates. We welcome the Assemblymembers confirming for us the correct amount, and we will update the website accordingly.]